What is the matter with us?

How can we be so clever that we can land on a comet next November? Yet we cannot stop children being exploited as soldiers or make a world in which children do not have to live by being garbage pickers?

Why?

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14 thoughts on “What is the matter with us?

  1. The growing development of different opportunities for individuals around the world is why we chose to have a life experiencing adventure. Exploration enables us to learn new things. We cannot stop children being exploited as soldiers because of the destruction taken place around the world. We cannot stop something that also puts our freedom to a halt. In some case, we may be forced into doing something we do not want to do, but realise later on that being forced has provided great opportunities for the societies around us. In short, we take pride knowing the invaluable services we perform!

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    • I like your point that “being forced has provided great opportunities for the societies around us.” It is true that sometimes upheavals, even violent ones, have resulted in something better that otherwise would not have happened. It is just that we have shown that we can achieve great things, like the Rosetta Mission, and yet simply making sure that a small child gets enough to eat or is not made to fight in a war is too hard for us. I struggle to understand why that has to be. Thanks for your insights Fathima. See you Tuesday.

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  2. I feel that sometimes life can be so challenging to keep up with. All the opportunities that we are offered we end up turning them down what for? Only because we had to due to a number of reasons that might just not be relevant or worth while to loose this only chance. So for that opportunity of a life time to go into space and discover something that has never been seen will just be incredible and offer other branches to develop our knowledge in those areas. we should go all out on it but also weigh the pros and cons to see both sides of the story. I feel a child should never experience that tormented environment at war and they will need a great deal of strength to deal with the emotional effects after that might just never go away. They are really unexperienced but could we sacrifice something to gain another even if it is our own children that we are sending to that front line? We have to decide if our freedom is worth while. Finally I want to say that a child should always have a opportunity to have an education that’s offering them to gain knowledge to make the right choices later in life. they will not have this advantage if they spend there whole day working in a garbage dump that all our rubbish has ended up in.

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    • Thanks for your insights Fatima. You said that a “child should always have a opportunity to have an education that’s offering them to gain knowledge to make the right choices later in life.” I would be interested to know what you mean by the “right choices … in life” and what kind of things would you have to be included in your education so that you would know how to make those right choices. What would you say?

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  3. The Rosetta space mission is very amazing, and it amazes me to see how something so clever is going to happen, but then when I see that children are being used as soldiers, just makes me see how unfair some things are in life. Who would send their own child in a war not knowing if you will ever see them again? I believe that everyone should have a choice on whether they want to be a part of something or not, It makes me wonder if the people sending their children even care whether the children are capable of doing so, and most importantly if they want to. Also the children relying on garbage to live absolutely shocks me, whilst one part of the world is living their life, another part is working on $2.50-$3.75 for eight hours, sorting through rubbish to recycle it for their own livelihoods.
    It amazes me how we can be so clever yet so unfair, but then again it would be hard to find an equality in everything.

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    • It certainly is amazing Devleta. I am looking forward to later in the year when the Philea lander from Rosetta will attempt to actually land on the comet. This is around November I think. I wonder how much money this has cost? I wonder how many very intelligent people put their minds to work to make it happen? I wonder if all that money and all those really intelligent people put their minds on ways to help those children you mentioned whether they could make a difference? What do you think?

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  4. Asking why is the answer to the question why. Call it a flaw humanity or evolution. The more civilised we become the more we broadcast our barbarism and brutality.

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    • So given that we are civilised enough to question our behaviour by asking ‘why?’, what then follows the question ‘why?’ What will it take to get us to the next level? How can we become civilised enough so that we actually DO something to curb our ‘barbarism and brutality’? Could the answer be found in education? government? law enforcement? something else?

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  5. There will always be brutality within life it is nature, human nature and animal nature. We cannot rectify something so ingrained within ourselves. The reason something is brutal is because we believe it to be. Animals certainly don’t think killing one an other for food it brutal or cruel. A cat has no objections to toying with it’s prey, it is not considered cruel. The vicious cycle that is life produces vicious organisms in turn. The only reason we can identify this is because we associate words with the emotions we feel.

    Trying to curb our humanity with law enforcement and government only presents us with the opportunity to dominate and enforce our barbarism onto others

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    • It is true what you say about animals. We can see such indifferent behaviour in people for sure. Perhaps there is something to consider in that while there are some people who fight inhumane acts, I doubt that there are any cats out there concerned about the fate of abused mice. Humans have a potential within them don’t they?

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  6. The knowledge that can be gained from the Rosetta Mission (i.e., possible exploitation in future) may be more worthwhile than the lives of those that are far, far away and whose struggles are something at the back of one’s mind, and not of concern. What does one have to gain from supporting developing countries against what information could be gathered from a rock out in space? Many of us are looking forward, in the future. Some of us are hedonistic, and some are still looking into the past. Yet wherever we look, isn’t it usually for our own gain? Maybe we’re just too selfish, too absorbed in our own interests to bother looking around us. The number of people who dedicate their lives to helping others (in this context, those who we can’t ‘gain’ anything from) are a minority. It’s easy to filter out things that you’re not interested in especially if you don’t bother looking.

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  7. The Rosetta mission is incredible. It is challenging, it complex it requires a lot of brain and extreme amount of work. It is going to be the first spacecraft to orbit the comet’s nucleus; it’s something that will be well remembered throughout the upcoming years. This accomplishment requires a lot of profession. However saving children around the world or giving them a home does not require any profession. The thought of growing and making equality in the world never comes to people minds, the thought that does come to people’s mind is growing up to be a professor or to be wealthy. Helping children only requires a lot of money and no one rich has enough empathy to sacrifice their luxurious life style for other people. Even if someone does have that much empathy and does give the homeless children a place to live, they won’t be remembered as much Neil Armstrong: the man who took the first step on the moon. They will not receive the fame or the publicity. The reason that people are doing the Rosetta mission instead of helping these children is because the idea of equality in the world is too major for their mind set.

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    • Yes Sadiqa, as you are saying, the ‘what’s in it for me?’ attitude does seem to be characteristic of humans and has stopped many people from taking any real interest in the needs of others. Do you realise that if every person in Australia was to give you one cent you would be get over $234 000? Yes, just one cent from everyone could achieve that. One cent is nothing to an individual, but imagine what one person could do with $234 000? My point is this: if everyone just gave a little bit of money, a little bit of their time, it could have an enormous impact. It could solve a lot of problems and end a lot of suffering. To do that though, one thing we need to address is what you have pointed out Sadiqa. We ALL have to stop caring about ‘what’s in it for me’? By the way, the answer to that question is of course – a better world for us all!

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